How you can prevent identity theft

By reviewing your financial documents regularly and keeping your personal information close, you can avoid becoming a victim of identity theft.

Tags: Fraud protection, Be prepared, Scams, How to, Security, Asset protection
Published: April 05, 2018

Learning how to protect your identity begins with knowing what information a thief looks for and how they can use it. Thieves will use your name, date of birth, Social Security number, mother’s maiden name or other key identity markers to impersonate you and access your bank accounts, obtain loans, make purchases or rent an apartment in your name.  

  • Stop: Click here if you suspect you may be the victim of identity theft hides details

    By flagging yourself as a potential identity theft victim immediately, you’ll minimize the damage done as well as help others protect their identity.

    • Notify local law enforcement to file a report.
    •  Call the Federal Trade Commission’s Identity Theft Hotline at 877-ID-THEFT (877-438-4338).
    •  Contact the three main credit bureaus and ask to have a fraud alert placed on your credit file.
      1.  Equifax: 800-525-6285  or equifax.com
      2.  Experian: 888-397-3742 or experian.com
      3.  TransUnion: 800-680-7289 or transunion.com
    • If you’re a U.S. Bank customer, call the U.S. Bank Fraud Liaison Center immediately at 877-595-6256.

Here’s a snapshot of steps you can take if you believe your identity has been stolen. Read more details in the article below.

Indentity theft infographic
PDF download

View full screen

View transcript


How you can prevent identity theft

Protecting your identity begins with knowing what information thieves look for and how they can use it. Thieves will use your name, date of birth, Social Security number, mother’s maiden name or other key identity markers to impersonate you and access your bank accounts, obtain loans, make purchases or rent an apartment in your name.

 

1. Review your financial statements regularly

2. Call your credit card company if a statement is late

3. Don’t give out personal information

4. Destroy documents that contain personal information

5. Carry only the credit cards you need

6. Deposit outgoing mail directly into post office boxes

7. Review your credit report annually to verify accuracy

 

© 2018 U.S. Bank.

U.S. Bank and its representatives do not provide tax or legal advice. Your tax and financial situation is unique. You should consult your tax and/or legal advisor for advice and information concerning your particular situation.

PDF View


Protect yourself from identity theft 

Even though identity theft is a felony, police cannot undo all of the damage that’s been done to you. That’s why it’s important to be vigilant. In the case of identity theft, the best defense is awareness and prevention. Follow these simple habits to help protect yourself. We’ve created a handy, downloadable tipsheet for preventing identify theft. Continue reading below for more in-depth information on how you can keep yourself protected.

1. Review all statements and your credit report regularly: These are usually the first places you’ll notice signs of identity theft. Make sure all information is accurate — transactions, purchases, deposits and withdrawals. If you see any irregularity, notify the respective company or organization.

2. Call your credit card company if a statement is late: You should receive a statement of account activity every month. If it’s late, it could be a sign that someone has stolen your credit card and changed the billing address so you wouldn’t notice additional charges. The best way to protect this information is to cancel your paper statements and sign up for online statements.

3. Don’t give out personal information: Unless you initiate the contact or know the caller, you should never freely give out information such as your full name, address, date of birth or Social Security number.

4. Destroy documents that contain personal information: Tear or shred all documents including credit card receipts, insurance forms, physician and bank statements and credit card offers.

5. Carry only as many credit cards as you need: The fewer credit (or debit, for that matter) cards that you carry with you, the better. That way, if you're purse or wallet are taken, fewer cards will be compromised. And don’t carry your Social Security card with you.

6. Deposit outgoing mail directly into post office boxes: It may not be the most convenient, but it’s safer than putting it in your own mailbox. Thieves could easily access your mailbox and obtain personal information from the contents.

7. Review your credit report once a year to verify accuracy: You’re entitled to one free credit report every 12 months from each of the nationwide consumer credit reporting companies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Request a report online by visiting annualcreditreport.com.
 

 

Your financial security is improtant to us.  Learn more ways to protect your assets.


Learn about our Mobile and Online Banking options with Digital Explorer, a quick and easy way to help you understand all you can do digitally at U.S. Bank.


Mortgage and Home Equity products are offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Loan products are offered by U.S. Bank National Association and subject to normal credit approval.